Aging Wine Underwater

Stick around long enough in the wine world and you'll learn one thing: it's traditionally non traditional. Yes you heard me correctly. The wine world is an oxymoron come to life. A perfect blend of old and new. A melded juxtaposition of old world heritage and new world advances. It's fascinating to watch it all unfold. Why is this the case? Because the wine world is made up of people who see the value in a strong root system, but also the importance of new horizons. 

With this concept comes experimentation. Trends that may or may not stick around: wines on tap, screw top wines, and now the latest phenomenon, aging wine underwater. 

Yo ho, Merlot, A Pirates Life for Me. How did this new and latest trend come about? Pirates! Ok not really. But in actual fact sunken ships had a lot to do with it. After several bottles of wine were discovered on ship wreckages, wine makers discovered the ocean may had aided in the aging process. 

The sea floor has no light and very little noise. It's temperature is cool and constant. In many ways It's an environment wine is used to yet it holds some unique possibilities. Some say the swaying of the ocean keeps the wine in a constant state of motion, which can bring out secondary and tertiary aromas that may not have come through before. Is this theory true? Time will tell. 

Sunken Treasure or Fools Gold? Like any trend, there are sure to be skeptics and believers. The nay sayers feel this passing trend is just a marketing ploy, a veiled attempt to offer consumers the latest and greatest idea. However, serious wineries are giving this concept, now being referred to as "Aquoir", a try. Mira Winery in Napa, Sketch Winery in Spain, and Gaia Winery in Greece are just some of the wine makers who have decided to experiment with this concept. Chateau Larrivet Haut-Brion in France recently submerged a barrel of Bordeaux they've aptly named Neptune. And even the team at Veuve Clicquot have climbed on board (pun most definitely intended). They built their own undersea storage container where they will monitor the progress of a selection of their bottles for the next fifty years. You better believe we'll be counting down the years! 

Whether it be to optimize storage space, prolong the aging process, or simply experiment for experiments sake, more and more wineries are walking this plank. We at Taste of Purple can't wait to see what washes ashore!